Welding Art Spotlight

For the artistic welder, using inert gas welding machines such as a TIG machine from Miller Welders is a great way to create clean joints with minimum oxidation. Argon gas like that available in Georgia from Sidney Lee Welding Supply shields the welder’s electrical current to keep it clean.

WELDING ART IN THE OUTBACK AND BEYOND
One Australian artisan is now a practicing welder after teaching herself how to operate welding equipment solely from videos on the internet (she lives in a rather remote area down under!). Jo Caminiti waited until retirement to take up the welding torch, but was rewarded with an enjoyable second career. Her welded wire sculptures feature fantastic creatures that originate in her imagination. They are now featured in art galleries in the nearest town.
Julie Lake is another rural artisan who uses her welding skills to make a strong artistic statement. Her work ranges from the sturdy¬—collaborations with a blacksmith to create mountaintop handrails—to the jewelry formed by delicate fibers of stainless steel wire as thin as a human hair. She was trained as a metalworker in art school, but after a few years of relative isolation out in rural Taos, New Mexico she took up the welding arts. Julie prefers an argon gas fueled TIG welder to fuse her artistic creations without blemishing them from the oxidization that can occur with unshielded welding equipment. Now her work is exhibited in local museums and shops. She is just one of many inspiring examples of artists in places like Georgia who have made welding a part of their careers.

AMERICAN INGENUITY TURNS INTO WELDED ART
Another artisan welder is a young American student who came across the welding machine early on. Already by her sophomore year of High School, Isabella Beason was proficient with welding equipment. An art class assignment inspired her to branch out from functional welding projects into a creative one. The resulting Octolampus, an octopus with the head of a vintage tungsten-bulb lamp, has placed in a national welding competition. Her tech teacher helped her use a crucible furnace to work the ¾ inch steel that makes up the legs of the award-winning octopus. For her hard work, she won not only cash but a welding machine too. If you are a student or DIY artisan who wants to make use of the best welding equipment available in Georgia, reach out to your local Sidney Lee Welding Supply store to get the welding supplies you need.